I previously discussed why I decided to sell my PAL retro games collection, and why I would be replacing my consoles with NTSC versions to play NTSC games. Now (months later) I will discuss how I went about doing just that and the best way I found to make the switch from PAL to NTSC.

NES
I sold my original Nintendo Entertainment System and replaced it with the Famicom AV. It’s a much more reliable model, has a more comfortable controller than the NES, and in my opinion the Famicom line is more aesthetically pleasing than the NES.

I’m not really interested in modifying my consoles for RGB so composite video is the best option available for the Famicom and looks acceptable running into the PVM via the stock cable.

For the games I purchased a Everdrive N8 from stoneagegamer.com, which allows me to play games from any region perfectly on the original hardware.

Sega Master System
I’ve held on to my original Sega Master System and have modified the console to allow me to switch between 50hz and 60hz via the reset switch. For a guide on how to do this, check out this video by Global Garage.

The console supports RGB natively and connects directly into my PVM via a SCART cable.

For the games I purchased a Master EverDrive X7 from stoneagegamer.com, which allows me to play games from any region perfectly on the original hardware.

Super Nintendo
I sold my Super Nintendo and replaced it with a Super Famicom, which looks identical to the PAL version.

The console supports RGB natively and connects directly into my PVM via a SCART cable.

For the games I purchased a SD2SNES from stoneagegamer.com, which allows me to play games from any region perfectly on the original hardware. This was not cheap, but if you consider how much some of the games go for on eBay, it soon pays for itself.

Mega Drive
I sold my Mega Drive, Mega Drive 2 and Sega CD and replaced it with a single Japanese Mega Drive, which looks identical to the PAL version.

The console supports RGB natively and connects directly into my PVM via a SCART cable.

For the games I purchased a Mega EverDrive X5 from stoneagegamer.com, which allows me to play games from any region perfectly on the original hardware. I decided to go with the X5 because I have no interest in using save states.

As for Sega CD games you can burn them without any issues as the Sega CD has no copy protection. There is even a new everdrive called the MegaSD that allows you to play Sega CD games on any Mega Drive without the Sega CD at all.

Nintendo 64
I sold my Nintendo 64 and replaced it with a Japanese Nintendo 64, which looks identical to the PAL version.

I’m not really interested in modifying my consoles for RGB so composite video is the best option available for the N64.

For the games I purchased a Ultra EverDrive64 v3.X from stoneagegamer.com, which allows me to play games from any region perfectly on the original hardware.

Sega Saturn
I sold my Australian Sega Saturn and replaced it with a Japanese Saturn and softmodded it using pseudosaturn and an Action Replay cartridge using this guide here.

The process was relatively simple, although I did struggle with the disk swapping for a while before I got it right, so perservere.

The console supports RGB natively and connects directly into my PVM via a SCART cable.

Burning backups is simple, just burn the image to a cd rom and you’re good to go.

Sony Playstation
Instead of replacing my original Playstation and PSONE i decided to modify the consoles to allow me to play burnt NTSC games. I have zero soldering experience, but I managed to install the chips to both consoles without any issues.

Sadly the laser on my original Playstation appears to be dying so I’m using it’s little brother for now. You can order replacement drives online but you’re probably better off going with something like the PSIO.

Both consoles support RGB natively and connect directly into my PVM via SCART cables.

Burning backups is simple with only a handful of games that need to be patched to bypass piracy protection before burning.

Sega Dreamcast
I sold my Sega Dreamcast and replaced it with a Japanese Dreamcast, which looks almost identical to the PAL version, the difference being the logo is red instead of blue.

The Dreamcast supports VGA natively for most games, which gives you the best picture. Unfortunately my PVM doesn’t support VGA so I decided to go with a SCART cable instead which connects directly into my PVM.

At first I thought I could just burn NTSC games and play them on my original PAL console but unfortunately the system doesn’t display NTSC games correctly (although it does still play them).

Burning games is simple, just keep in mind that there are some low quality releases floating around out there that removed content from the game to fit them onto smaller disks, and that a small number of games wont fit on regular cd roms at all (Skies Of Arcadia being the prime example).

Playstation 2
Instead of replacing my original Playstation 2 and Playstation 2 slim I decided the best way to play NTSC games on my consoles was to use the FreeMcBoot software in combination with the original consoles hard drive slot/network adapter to play disk images.

Doing this dramatically decreases load times and negates the need to burn physical disks. For a guide on how to do this, check out Adam Koraliks video here.

Both consoles support component video, which I run into my GARO component to scart converter which then runs into my PVM.

Xbox
I’ve held on to my original Xbox and have softmodded the console to play image files from the systems harddrive using this guide here.

The modification is really simple, you just need a copy of the original spinter cell, a USB to memory card cable and an old USB stick, all of which can be found online for relatively cheap (if you dont own them already)

Once the mod is complete you can then drag and drop games from your computer onto the Xbox harddrive via FTP using the systems network adapter and you’re ready to play.

The console supports component video, which I run into my GARO component to scart converter which then runs into my PVM.

Gamecube
FAILED. I installed the modchip onto my Japanese gamecube successfully, but for whatever reason it refused to run backup games despite having no problems running official disks from multiple regions.

The system requires that you not only install a modchip but adjust the laser pots on the board until you hit a sweet spot that allows it to read burnt media. Unfortunately I never got it to work. Disks would start to read and then crash a few seconds in. It may have been my disks, but I only had one type to test.

In the end I cut my losses and decided to run my gamecube backups on the wii using the nintendont software, following this guide here, which works perfectly.

While I would have prefered to use the actual hardware, this solution works perfectly for now and will do the job until another solution presents itself in the future.

Wii
This is the last console impacted by the PAL plague, but the list of games that are gimped is so small that I’m not going to bother replacing the console.

I’ve already soft moded my Wii to play extinct virtual console games, so if I ever want to play burnt NTSC games I’m sure it wont be all that difficult to modify the console via it’s software to do so.

The console supports component video, which I run into my GARO component to scart converter which then runs into my PVM.

One final thing worth mentioning, a 100w voltage converter is required to play some Japanese consoles in Australia. I purchased one from here which arrived super quickly and has served me well

Finally Done
I hope you found this article helpful, there were a few bumps in the road (the gamecube being the most notable) but overall it was relatively smooth sailing and I’m definitely glad I decided to replace my PAL collection. I not only have access to way more games now, but I can play them as the devlopers intended them to be played. 100% speed and with no cropping. Thanks for reading.